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everyday. if necessary use words. i have never known anybody who preached the gospel more effectively in so many ways than george. a piecemaker. a humanitarian. a teacher. a minister. a congressman. a senator. a voice for the voiceless. and a champion for hungry children. in some ways it is and higher need that george's adult life began in war. when asked about his military service he would always minimize his heroism. but the fact is that if he had done nothing after reaching the age of 25 years old today we would be celebrating the life of an american hero. 35 missions in the be 24. as scott said so well last night there would have been a lot more had the war gone. a lot more than one close call. shrapnel penetrating the windshield at one point, nearly killing him. a blown wheel, an emergency landing, and on his 30 fifth and final mission, so much fire that when he landed they counted the holes in his fuselage and wings and it number 110. george's life was not an easy one. he saw more than his share of hardship, loss he fought many battles beyond the ones in the airp
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to by the ads in many ways has that changed on decades. the focus is invisible to us. i try to write in this book is taking place with people who don't go on tv and whose names are almost entirely unknown. the outside world has changed dramatically and is changing every year, sometimes every month coming of the campaigns are getting a lot smarter about what they do, why they do it, and i think that the general campaign coverage is struggling to keep up explaining to the voters and the viewers and what they are doing and why and what the sort of thinking is under hurting all of that. >> host: you are talking about it what is causing the victory lap and you have this picture in your mind there is this lab. can you give some perspective in the campaigns now how many people are working on this stuff? was a typical campaign, how many people are working on the campaign and how many people would be working on this sort of data analysis and all the things you're talking about >> guest: the empiricism is informing everything will sort of rigorous experimental methods with her some sort of eve
if he hadn't spent billions of pounds on the top down we organization and used the money to employ nurses rather than sacking them. [applause] but here's what i hate most of all. here's what i hate most of all. it's the whole way they designed the nhs reorganization. based on the model of competition that there was in a privatized utility industry, gas, energy and water. what does that tell you about these tories? what does that tell you about the way they don't understand the values of the nhs? the nhs isn't what like the gas, water industry. the nhs is the pride of britain. it is based on whole different set of values for our country. it just shows that these old adage is true or not than it ever was, you just can't trust the tories on a national health service. [applause] [applause] >> so let me be clear, let me be clear, the next labour government will end the free market experiment. it will put the right principles back in the heart of the nhs and it will repeal the nhs bill. [applause] friends, this is where i stand. this is what i am. this is what i belief. this is my faith.
at her credibility on these things. and that was so dramatic that we don't like people to lie to us. this is about as close as a presidential candidate obama, looking to let democrats come to say she lied to us. i think that undermines what is going on. who else is pushing it is important. if you have a candidate who is in sioux falls, south dakota and they've been on the campaign trail all day, they're exhausted. they've made 12 different stops and to be here in oklahoma city, we kind of pass that off and say doesn't make a great deal of difference who they are or what they think they are at the appointed time. >> host: gary hart. >> guest: okay, gary hart created the original set of challenging people in the media. i think most people in the media knew that he ran around a bit, but rather than just letting it go, we have to remember we are out of time with the media to look into that so carefully. there is a backstage area. one of the problems we have today's politicians have no backstage area. whatever they do, wherever it is as real as that. ballot to be covered. that wasn't the
as possible. but that's why we're still using the insurance system. because hopefully now insurance companies -- how many of you got refund check, by the way, from your insurance company, right? because all these years they've been overcharging for administrative costs. um, and so insurance companies now will regulate by what's a reasonable amount of money to charge a provider. there's going to be problems, there's always problems. i mean, as i tell my students in constitutional law, this country is a work in progress. sometimes the government's going to go too far, and we need to rein them in. i'm not in favor of excessive government involvement in my life. um, and sometimes private industry will go too far in terms of wanting to make it all about how much profit they make, and we'll rein them in because health care is not something that should be guided solely by the bottom line. so i think the government has a role, and i think we have to keep a catch -- watchdog, citizens' deal on how much of a role we give them. >> i would add to that that birth control access should be a nonpartisan iss
that will play in the future. this is about ten minutes. >> good evening. welcome and thank you for joining us here. my name is richard fontaine the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you to celebrate publication of the look of the revenge of geography with the map tells us about conflicts and the state. i've heard it said before that you honor agreed author not by reading his books but by buying them. you will be happy to know books can be sold after the conversation on the stage in this room. bob kaplan's work is well known to many in the audience he's been a fellow at cnas and a correspondent for atlantic for about a quarter of the century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i became acquainted with his riding through the book arabist which is a group of westerners living and working in the middle east. since that book, the title of the work, the coming anarchy, imperial grounds have provoked intense debate in policy circles. the most recent book monsoon and the future of american power has become required reading by those that interes
best of all, booktv talk to reyna grande about her memoir, "the distance between us." in the book she talks about her experience growing up in mexico without her parents immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> host: reyna grande, what is [speaking in spanish] >> guest: [speaking in spanish] the way i grew up knowing [speaking in spanish] was a reference to the united states. but to me, because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. during that time that my parents were gone, working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think my parents were on the other side of those mountains. post a word as you grow up -- which is where we borne? >> guest: i was born in mexico and a little town that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, it is three hours away. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came in 1877 when i was two years old and he sent for another three years late
on their campaigns. this interview was recorded at the u.s. naval academy. .. >> how does that dominate campaign coverage with issues or performance of candidates. >> host: start with the media. mitt romney 47% and barack obama guns and religion. >> this morning i just ran 47%. how many media outlets? dozen last one day wore one week or one month? guns was relatively short. three weeks. mitt romney 47% we have not seen the end of it. it is about one month. the stories drop-off but they are drug backend by opponents or events. i am sure coming out of the presidential debate they will wonder if he will respond to that. at issue which gaf we need to pay attention to. represent a character flaw or the incapacity to act? or just normal things? >> if they are hanging out in the public with the internet, youtube distributed more broadly and quickly is the hour cable -- archival capability we can see what barack obama said 1998. were mitt romney by the way not one bit of coverage of 47% in may. there was a fund-raising event but nobody pulled the story in may. not until the video popped up that came bac
and in politics, and a lot of those states who are a field director and using the slowly advanced data in 2008 went out and went to state parties or labor unions or institutions on the left and there's a sort of pollination that is taking place that i think a little more active on the democratic side right now than on the republican side. .. and the ore opponents by using data. but there are scrambling to sort of build anything approaching the scaling of the obama campaign and anything approaching l am ambition of the obama campaign. types you can solve in six months are going to be smaller than what you can solve in four years. >> host: doipg you the campaign is going to rely more on messaging or on the targeting techniques. what is is the mix? did does message still matter. is it really if you can fine tune it and target it better. that's going to be the difference. how do you put that all together? >> the message still matters. one of the things, the whole narrative, you know, in the bulk of my book takes ten to fifteen years, has taken place in an era of a real partisan polarization. one o
in your mind that it is this lap. can you give us some perspective in these campaigns now how many people are working on this stuff? if you can tell us what is a typical campaign, how many people are usually working on this campaign and how many people would be working on this sort of data, analysis and all things you're talking about. >> guest: on some level on smart campaigns and data analysis, pure system is sort of informing everything to do. there's more and more stuff on the campaign to contest that either through rigorous experimental methods or through some sort of come even if it's not randomized, a lot of these extremes are. there some sort of discipline testing. so smart campaign, and the obama campaign is symptomatic of this, basically thinking everything the campaign does is form by david. and you get down to the state level campaigns and they definitely are having people who are voter file managers are basically dealing with data or talking people are just dealing with david. you get up to presidential campaign and one of the things the romney campaign had to do this summer
between us." in the book she shares her experience of going up in mexico without her parents who immigrated to the united states illegally to find work. this is about half an hour. >> reyna grande what is -- >> the way i grew up knowing it was a reference to the united states but to me because i grew up in this hometown surrounded by mountains and i didn't know where the united states was, to me it was the other side of the mountain. and during that time when my parents were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. >> where did you grow up and originally where were you born? >> i was born in mexico in southern mexico and the little city that no one has heard of. when i mention acapulco everyone knows i'll could poke so it was a few hours away from acapulco. >> windage of parents come to the united states? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was three years old and he sent for my mother a few years later so my mother came in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you
that time, my parents were gone working here in the u.s.. i looked at the mountains and think my parents were over there, on the other side of those mountains. that was that to me. >> host: originally, where were you born? >> guest: in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that no one heard of, but when i mention alcapaco, everybody knows that. it was three hours from there. >> host: when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> guest: my father came here in 1997 when i was two years old, and he send for my mother a few years later in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> host: when did you come to the united states? >> guest: i came to the united states in 198 # 5. >> host: how old were you? >> guest: in may of 1985, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well, i had been separated from my father for eight years so when he returned to mexico in 1985, we convinced him to bring us back here. he was not coming back to mexico, and we didn't want anymore time separated fro
more complex than some of those little stories and anecdotes would lead us to believe. >> host: let's look forward. one thing that is very important about william rehnquist, he hired a man named john roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i was be
frequently on numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man who has seen things happen and comments on them in, okay, in my humble opinion in a very reasonable and accurate way. he'll be followed by dr. robert freedman who is the peggy mire how far pearlstone professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and visiting professor of science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to both the u.s. department of state and the central intelligence agency, and he is the author of four books on soviet foreign policy and is also the editor, has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank, he is the strategic study institute's expert on soviet bloc and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline: russia's changing position in asia and co-editor of "the soviet military in the future." and he will -- the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen, my colleague here at heri
on affirmative action. joining us, the author of "mismatch," and welcome. >> nice to be with you. >> host: joining us from new york, the aclu racial justice program serving on the senior staff, welcome. >> thankou. >> host: the supreme court heard a case this week dealing with affirmative action so tell us what happened. >> guest: sure. the case pending before the court was brought by a young lady named abigail fisher, and she said based on race, she was violated, and basically our position in that of many other organizations and individuals was that the university of texas has a fair process in place that expands opportunity for all people and should be allowed to have additional factors in addition to scores to create a learning environment to benefit all students preparing them for a global environment they will enter when they leave school. we made technical arguments about the standard of review that was at issue, but the crux of it was we wanted the university's process was legal, to be upheld. >> host: can you briefly explap how the university of texas, the old revisions of race, a
participation which in 2011 avoided excessive use of force in containing public demonstrations and rioting in algier. while they are plausible explanation and point to algerians's exceptionalism, i feel there's a lack of reliable information on the diversity of views that algerians hold of their system of government, of their history, and of their preferred path forward. the inner workings of their politics is opaque and constant source of debate and speculation, even within political connected circles. i think analytic modesty is called for, and, after all, it would have been plausible to explain away the upheaval in tunisia in late 2010, for example. instead, i think we might ask what does instability look like in algeria? there does not appear to be a sizable appetite among algerians for mass upheaval. popular upheaval. the state, meanwhile, has shown itself able to contain local unrest, has largely dealt with internal insurgency, and appears able to avert opposition. what is it less equipped to deal with? what signs should we look for to suggest or not a coming shift in the status quo?
. but we did not take account of it and you're right. the data don't tell us. >> i am dr. caroline a physician and health policy analyst. did you look at what seems to be the financial in the economy what stieglitz distinguishes between people that make the pie bigger and just take a larger part of the pipe, equity, capital where they come in and make the company more efficient by the staff and then they don't take that money and invested into another business to do the same thing so the money doesn't go to new companies producing new things and offering new jobs. it just goes to the reverse mortgages. .. we avoided a lot of the issues that you raised, however, by looking at ed and rather than average income. so a further to average, than the fact you have these enormous gains at the top of the average. and so, that's why we choose the median. so we wash out some of that. is that an independent fact your ensuring to explain what's happening to the economy, that job creation in wages and salaries, however you measure it. this just happened to be too neat the perfect way to measure f
from college students, 225-85-3883. also remember you can send us your tweet at or post your comments on facebook, and send an e-mail we will try to read those in the first 45 minutes as well. here is a wall street journal story -- excuse me, "the washington times" story on the supreme court consideration of racial quotas and they say this a little bit we hear that about that 2003 case the "the washington times" reports they shut down the seattle system that divided the city's elementary schools equally along racial lines to justice john roberts wrote the majority opinion called the meds extreme. in 2009 the court ruled that new haven connecticut violated the civil rights five-year fighters after the results of a promotion exam because not enough blacks had passed. with liberal leaning justice elena kagan reducing herself a key vote could apply again with justice anthony kennedy as we heard from adam. sandy a democrat. what do you think? >> caller: yes. >> host: what do you think of affirmative action in this case specifically for the
a supply line to the soviet union fighting for its life against nazi germany. the u.s. joined in that occupation after the u.s. joined the war and the russians did not leave as they had agreed to do it and instead set up a separatist movement in the northwest which first demanded autonomy from iran. that crisis was the first item on the docket of the newly formed united nations and of the first five resolutions of the security council starting in january of 1946. three of the five involve iran and azerbaijan. >> what role did the cia played in iran in the 1950's? >> well, peter, that's a good question. i don't have many details. many pyrenean friends of mine think i know more about the operations than i do of the cia. people argue over this endlessly what we do know is that the early 1953 president eisenhower inherited a difficult situation from president truman and gave the order to plan an operation inside iran to bring down prime minister mohsen def and to replace him with someone believed to be more in accordance with our interest. >> so did the prime minister get replaced
for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our claman opportune -- auditorium on our web site as well as joining us via c-span today and in the future. we would ask everyone in houston make sure your cell phones have been turned off this week prepare for everyone's benefit in recording of today's program. we will post the program in 24 hours on our heritage web site or everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is.there steven bucci with the homeland security in our douglas and sarah allison center for foreign-policy studies. is focuses cybersecurity as well as defense support to civil authorities. dr. bucci served in america for three decades as an army special forces officer and top pentagon official and commanded the third battalion special forces and became military assistant to defense secretary donald rumsfeld in july 2001 and served throughout the secretary's term and his retirement he continued at the pentagon as deputy assistant secretary of defense for homeland defense and america's security affairs. prior to joining us here he was a lead consulta
and convinced they do well because they love us. thus was born in the book 50 things liberals love to hate. i hope you enjoy it. >> thanks for coming out tonight. my name is chris this is brian weir founders of the canada party. we wrote a book. i will go a quick introduction. we're here from vancouver and brian is a candidate to give the system speech. will read some chapters in may due q&a then you can make noise and by us beers. [laughter] we are from vancouver. we started to realize b-1 to to get into political humor with short films in comedy and journalism but we do have television and canada. so we were watching the conventions but over the past two years everyone announcing the candidacy for the presidency of the united states we have seen york can it is and frankly they scare the shipped out of us. so we were running candidate to be the president. not brian, the canadian government but the people we love our big brother. we are here to help. we did a campaign video in january. it went by role. with media tv it -- to be around the world so we took off with another couple of
. >> u.s. naval academy professor the old army in "war and peace" with the mean by the old army eight? >> it is a term commonly used by historians the indian fighting army, there is a joke it is the army before every war. my book starts with a professional as asian from the war 18 toile end and how the process occurs how that plays in the civil war. >> host: give us a snapshot of the old army prior to the war between 12 looks like. >> before 1812 is said nonprofessional they obtain their position through political influence and as a consequence because they are not professionals who went through the body of education, and they don't perform very well. washington d.c. is burned attempts to invade canada doesn't go well. there are catastrophes as a great victory. so you have a big movement their needs to be a more systematic way to be commanders. >> the crucial figure is a wonderful figure be cut as the career begins right through the opening. but jake the ground and other officers will sky is the most important the did gen deficit is to build a professional institution to bring it to t
and to the child care centers and they can put a pan on the map. i agree with we have to use more of those techniques in the reauthorization and we have to be more demanding to but i also believe this is a campaign in the congress that is definitely a challenge to get anything constructive said. we have to push more but i would disagree i think there is an interesting activity going on in the state but i think there is a lot of shella activity going on and very serious situations in terms of what is going on for the state funding and early education and in some places where it may look good systemwide it's very precarious, we will be able to maintain in terms of a strong early childhood system. but my final remarks since i was allowed to have the last word is to the business leaders and i would urge all of the business leaders that have increasingly stepped up to support early childhood to also step up to the tax-writing committee and point out all of the tax loopholes we can close and all of the tax increases that were in absolutely liable the will provide the revenue that we need to prov
discusses her education of afghan women and girls. they left the country for the u.s. after the russian invasion. she also started a home accessory business that employs afghans. from the woodrow wilson center this is an hour. >> the director of the program at the wilson center, back to welcome you all to today's meeting, how to protect women and girls when america leaves afghanistan focusing on education. i was coming down the stairs with our speaker, she said the problem is not only protecting girls but also protecting girls and boys and make sure they have access to education this meeting is sponsored by the centers asia program and women's leadership initiati initiative, a new program run by my dear friend and colleague, she is the president of the chair of the initiative and we will be hearing a lot from her because she is a very active person and organized meetings all the time. we actually had a joint meeting a week ago for afghani women. are with like to use this opportunity to welcome her back to the center and also i would like to welcome mrs. johnson who is one of the women p
in technical preparations at an earlier stage. these reforms should make easier for us to cooperate with our partners across the region. to strengthen the regional missile posture with japan and australia and south korea missile defense approaches we are integrating japanese sensors into the space surveillance network and cooperating with australia on the space capabilities. we are enhancing our access and sustainment across the region in addition to rotational the deploying the combat ships in singapore as i mentioned earlier we are exploring options for training there. with of the philippines we're exploring options for the rotational deployments in priority areas. we are focused on prisons and capabilities and strengthening their maritime domain awareness. we are in tikrit ingalls commissions and capabilities with japan and taking numerous steps to solidify our enduring presence on the creative peninsula we have our technology sharing and defense trade with india another state so important to our rebalanced and we believe to the broad security and prosperity of the 21st century. we believ
in the u.s. come here in washington, d.c. wide? because they wanted to send a message. and for that matter, i hope that the united states of america, and whoever will be elected, will take a leadership decision, maybe it's not popular that it will be a moral decision to stop the nuclear race in iran today. and i don't know how many of you have followed the weekly reports, and what was written there, but something very interesting popped up from the report. when you go into look at the writing of the arab leaders, not israelis, not jewish, arab leaders in the middle east, they are afraid from iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today
's ineffective or not a good use of funds? >> the president and the administration have proposed 30-40 programs for elimination because of a lack of evidence on impact. and some of those have been successful, some of those haven't. this is an example worsens when the full-time members, i should note some of those are but some of those are small programs that were critically or three years ago i kept getting funded because of history. i don't even know the names of all those but those are the kind of programs where they don't have evidence of success that should be eliminated. not a all of those have been eliminate by some have. he has also established the principle that actually funding things based on performance. i think the invest in innovation fund which is a signature initiative is a hallmark ever to say let's debate but let's define that to those things that significant evidence and result -- let's find what works and expand the. >> we are big supporters of investing in innovation fund and a number of things that are attracted. working in combination in partnership with school district th
can engage, we can work together, but we've got to keep both of us that have been identified of those who can work together in congress. and now is the time to build on those of us who are -- not structuring us apart. so with your support, we will not don't get congress moving forward, we will be up to save lives as we are doing it. thank you very much, and god bless. >> moderator: i want to thank both candidates, congress brian bilbray, scott peters, appreciate your insight. and the level to which it engaged. >> we are live this one at the american enterprise institute. they're holding a panel on the presidential race voting patterns and the latest polls. panelist will also examine the closest senate and house contests and we'll hear from norman ornstein, author of the new york times bestseller, it's even worse than it looks, and "washington examiner" michael barone. >> on behalf of my aei colleagues, michael barone, henry olsen and norm ornstein, i'd like to welcome all of you and our c-span viewers to this, the final pre-election session of aei's election watch program. we will be
such a weakened position that it's forced us to open ourselves to any mets -- methods, be it outsourcing and leveraging that private effort in capital and just letting you do your thing. in some ways we could be the libertarian dream here. [laughter] >> i saw two people leave the room. [laughter] here's a question, what's the advice for do detroit? overlap, overlay, not an ip instant city in china, right? there's no unified government, it's fragmented at the bureaucracy level, and there's this capacity issue, serious capacity issue within government. what's the advice? >> well, i don't suspect that a lot of the entrepreneurs in this room who are the talent pool for the next economy in detroit are thinking how do i get a job with the city. so -- >> no career advice. >> no, but i mean, seriously. the young talent pool, the 20-somethings and 30-somethings are not thinking about the public sector as a career path. so let's just be blunt and honest. the city is not going to be able to harness the talent that's there that will get the city to the next place. so invert the qu
buildings and properties in the city which don't pay taxes but use our services and use our roads, put the stress or extra burden on property taxpayers. that is part of the burden they have to bear for being the capital city and some times what the state wants to do doesn't necessarily follow the typical ordnances most businesses and residents have to comply with. city ordinances don't necessarily apply to the state so it can be a fraction point but we try to work through those things and understand the benefits of being the capital city far away from the down side that we have to deal with but the biggest challenge is always jobs and that is true of any community. you have seen what we have to offer. it is a vibrant community and there's a lot going on and a brand-new hospital coming online and brand new courthouse that is a $15 million project and the commerce center down the road that is the major construction. we are going to have a big construction project on the interstate that will make traffic move better and commercial development going on in this city and in the census w
at 8 on c-span. later, the candidates hoping to represent arizona's 9th district in the u.s. house, democrat kirsten and steven later here on c-span2. >> what is the dinner, and how did it come about? >> so the al smith dinner is the most famous that presidential candidates show up every four years, and they show up, democrats and republicans -- i mean, it's really a memorial dinner for smith, and i think it's the thing that if anyone heard al smith's name at this point in time, that that's where you heard about al smith unless you hang around these hallowed halls. it's his lasting legacy, the place where the name gets out. it's held every year, not just every four years. prominent figures come in, it's a memorial dinner, a catholic charity dinner. people get together to assess the legacy of al smith and presidential candidates always especially to crack jokes about each other. >> in fact, they show up together most times, show up both the democrat and republican nominees show up together. we want to show you some of the past al smith's dinners. >> might i ask if senior clark comes
is the most divisive in u.s. history and says the president has allowed his ideology to trump the good of the populace. is a little under an hour. >> good afternoon, everyone. i am the president of the clear blue loose policy institute and i thank you for joining us and welcome you to our conservative woman's network. special thanks to the heritage foundation. we have been putting this on for years ended to a pleasure to work with a fine organization like the heritage foundation. i am happy to introduce today's speaker, kate obenshain. you have seen her on fox news where she is a passionate, articulate defender of conservative values and has one of the loose policy institute's most popular campus speakers for many years and she has been speaking and mentoring young women that we worked with for decades and helped me out so many times to help the institute, and i am grateful to you for that. she has also been in almost all of our great conservative women calendars. our 2013 calendar is out. we do it differently with not only beautiful women but beautiful scenes from march of 2013 and th
there for a couple of cycles and it gives the employer safe harbor if they use e-verify but otherwise the irs would be able to be there to audit and it could take yards and dollar an hour and turn them into a $16 our employee which opens the door for iowans and hopefully i can finish in their robotic [applause] christie: what is your plan to deal with illegal immigration while still making iowa a warm and welcoming place for new immigrants? christie: well, first of all, we need to make sure we secure our borders and make sure that we don't have people coming across to my guns or drugs from their cross illegally. we need to make sure lawful citizens did first chance at jobs. but we also need to make sure that people have a path with the citizenship. it is very important that if someone is willing to die for their country, willing to work are in school that they have an opportunity to become a citizen of this country. we are taught to love our neighbors as ourselves, and i know because i have talked to a lot of people in this area how important the emigrants are to making sure that we continue to hav
buy the book. thank you for joining us here on booktv for a few minu >> i'm ready to talk about, i will come to that point, about bridging the state of religion. but if you separate or distinguish the state of religion, tell me what you put instead of religion. because what we are facing in the west now, we all know this has citizens, i live in europe, you live in the united states of america and we all know the problem we have with our democracies now is not the decision of religions, but some decisions of transnational cooperation and economic power that are deciding without us being able to do anything. in democracy we are still dealing with powers that are beyond the democracy procedure. banks, transnational corporations, and we're facing with people are deciding. in greece, in spain, in italy we have technocrats are coming to solve the problem. we never elected them. but money is choosing them. so we also have to deal with the simplistic answer when it comes to separate religion from state, what do you have? directing the state or imposing decision on the state which is also i
. the major measure of personality widely used is called the big five. it measures to open to experience. you like the ideas? to come out to your intellectual talks? you're probably high to an experienced the libertarians and liberals are really come up really high. this is how to counter other so often. they like to go to the same sorts of things. conservatives are low. but now, let's look at the three traits that have really associated with sociability. on a black pcb data for extroversion. how much do just that and with a bow? by being of people. liberals and conservatives are identical. the more inch averted, not as oriented towards socializing. the second set is how nice, warm, friendly, how easy is it to get along with you? liberals and conservatives are equal, libertarians are low. conscientiousness. how michiko the pull of obligation because you need to do things for people? something needs to be done your conservatives are the highest, but they're pretty close to liberals. some on this major personality, just as libertarians are really curious, open-minded people, but they're not tha
does anything that the u.s. government says, although we still say it. .. i remember when secretary clinton went on her first trip to china she had a forum with 16 women from different areas in china. was blogged, it was streamed, people would challenge the hiv/aids policy, incredibly brave women and secateurs clinton provided a forum for them to speak to a larger audience. these were the kind of things i think we can do. >> a question from right here in the room in the audience. president obama and governor rahm yo both said they want america to have a positive relationship with china but they must play by the rules. how well they pushed china if they think china is not playing by the rules, house specifically, dr. bader? >> how specifically will they -- >> push china if they are not playing by the rules? >> my last act in government, my last time around was second place in negotiations with a succession of the world trade organization. the world trade organization lays out in detail global rules. it was a 17 year negotiation for china, and it made extensive commitments. china used
. he has been joining us from st. louis. mr. o'harrow thank you for being on on the camp -- "the communicators." >> guest: thanks for having me. >> you can either embrace the kind of approach that congress woman wilson has embraced. she signed a pledge to support the cut, cap and balance program. that is a tea party approach to balancing the budget. it has no new revenues for even the wealthiest of americans and is so draconian that it would require deep cuts in social security and medicare over time. we can embrace a balanced approach. that is what i support. i think we can go back to the kind of tax rates we had under the clinton administration when those upper income earners were doing well and the entire economy was growing. we are going to have to make some tough choices and a balanced approach is the only approach i believe will get us there. >> heather, your rebuttal? >> it's amazing to me congressman heinrich that you can stand here having voted for a trillion dollar deficits for the last four years, the
under the obama administration the u.s. experienced a morbid of the infrastructure of the economy, the public sector become a manipulative force intervenes in the financial sectors with gowrn tee that attract talent and -- [inaudible] >> the worst this is the grain cast of the obama administration. and the epa now has a game control over [inaudible] has deemed a po lou assistant, danger to the environment. and co2 is the manhattan and keeps us alive. the circle of life and attempt to oppress co2 epitomizes the kind of antinature, antiimper prize spirit of the administration. it's the reason we need another supply side of the same kind we had under ronald reagan. >> would you change anything you wrote in the original "wealth and poverty." >> i would have changed quite a lot. i mean, there. all kind of detail that have changed. but i found that do try to change one thing would be to change everything. so, you know, you have in to a bunch of editorial work. instead of changing it, i essentially retained the old book and added 30,000 new words at the beginning and end. and revision of
and help us out of this thing and help our teachers, police, firefighters be able to stay on the job. but when i did that and embrace the president at that time, maybe the president of the united states. and the way my mother and father raised by three sisters and myself was that you respect others, does she do unto others, particularly, by the way, if that person happens to be the president of the united states of america. [applause] and the notion that some in my former party was so disdain not active decency. i can understand political ramifications and not think about it that way. that being nice to somebody like that and been decent in being chastised for it is exactly what we need to stop doing. governor ridge said we have to respect each other. you don't have to agree. that's okay. and senator mccain mentioned earlier with ronald reagan and tip o neill, they probably didn't agree on much of anything, yet they were able to have an affable relationship and be decent to one another and not tear each other down in the process. we have to get back to that and keep talking about thi
was the most popular form of fiction really in the mid-19th century. >> it's well past the time when women used pseudonyms, published under male names. it was a greater success rate. >> i think that this is probably one of the most influential works of literary fiction in american history. as we talked about before, lincoln's famous statement about it but not just in 1852. the popularity as richard was saying was something that has, right to the present in the 1890s during the jim crow era. "uncle tom's cabin" again commit very important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of
that are still out there, and engage in a big discussion about whether all of us are going to have to do to convince the public that this thing is worth saving, being public education. if we can answer that question, we know how far we will have to go to make a compelling case that we're giving every child that comes into public education and opportunity to hit the ball out of the park. and where teachers are -- with the type of professionalism and respect they deserve. this is, i go back, beat it is again. the wisconsin situation made it so much harder to have that conversation than it's ever be been. >> we will let joe have the last word. please join me in thanking joe and terry for a great discussion. [applause] 's. let me say it again. in less than two weeks, big, big, big study coming out on the powethepower of unions state-by. look for to the. finally, the video of this event will be up momentarily. thanks for joining us. stay tuned for the our next event which will be in the middle of november which will be a plug on my book. we look forward to seeing you then. thanks so much. [in
, even by the small number of people who used to engage. not that there's no one who engages. no that there are people in every community who aren't engaged. but my guess is they're a smaller percentage of people who are in the first stage of engagement, in second stage, backup, third stage, showing up for rallies and marchs, showing up in city council halls. half of democracy's showing up. those of you who are under 30 in this room, you can assail yourself as being a generation that doesn't show up. and you don't show up in part because you've grown up corporate without a fraction of the civic experience of people who were fighting the civil rights battle as students in the south and in other parts of the country, putting earth day on the map for environmental focus in april 1970, 1500 events around the country. and being embroiled in controversy over the vietnam war, student rights on campus, many other issues. those gave students experience. they came back, they talked to students who didn't go out with them, it was of an educational process. they had teach-ins. they didn'
>> and now, members of the first post-9/11 u.s. naval graduating class talk about their experience serving in iraq and afghanistan. this event held on september 11, 2012 is hosted by the navy memorial here in washington d.c. it's just under an hour. [applause] the mac thanks to all my classmates and coeditors and mentors who helped make this possible. in february to the night vision this book. everything is happening for me as an active-duty salt and afghanistan in kandahar. i was working for general nick nicholson, doing cool things is a swell stansell are now, supporting my country. maybe i should do a book. really, compared to ben wagner? really, compared to jacob sabe? and f-18 pilot to saved the stryker battalion. well, made cbs colleague, jason jackson. the story of this book were exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on
, for getting us started. thank you all for for for being. it's really exciting to have this thing underway, we've been working on it for a long time. what we do at techonomy, up til now it's within antic i havation -- invitation only, leaders thing in the desert, and we wanted to get your message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there are some messages that are not sufficiently understood. and that's what, i hope, you will be hearing throughout the day today. and the messages at this event are focused on four issues; u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth -- which is tied, of course, to the first two -- and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one. we are very proud to be in detroit because we see it as a great city that has incredible potential that we would just love to help participate in that dialogue to help move that process forward a little faster. but what we really want to do is change the dialogue about how the world thinks about technology. because we really don't think it is understood or a
and gave us that right. i think we are losing sight of that right now. i have never been as afraid for our country as i am right now. i am very afraid for our country right now. we have to hold on to the greatness that we have. let me give you a little background here. you have to know when you are a winner. while that sounds like it's self-evident, it is not. when i was with "seal team six", i thought i was winning. you know, member of an elite counterterrorism unit, you are deployed all over the world working with the best people, and i thought i was winning because i was a member of this elite team. but i wasn't. i was in terrible husband and father and that is something that is cultivated in an early age. i had to serve one master and my master was the seal team. if you think you are winning, we can take this across the board. are we winning as a nation, are we winning as an individual, are you winning is a relationship. it is easy when you define what you want to accomplish. defined mission congressman and congressmen and then you can define if you are winning. this young man here, th
of business for us it is run through the model of the u.s. tax system, what the effects would be for folks, households of different income levels, see what happens to the tax rates, and those in the room today have a handout that summarizes the results we have. those at home and work should be able to find the full study on our website,, and what you see is for a typical middle class house hole, it's an increase of $2,000. that's the neighborhood of a four percentage point increase in the tax rates, roughly the same increase in tax rates for people at other income levels. if you look for people at the lowest income levels and median income levels, a four point raise in the tax rates. dollar amounts varies for folks in the lowest, it's $400. the one really strong noticeable difference is the high end of the income distribution. people up in the top 1% of the income distribution, their tax rate goes up 7%, and that works out to $120,000. obviously, the large amount of money at stake is because folks in the top 1% earn a large amount of money, and the reason why the larges
candidates for the u.s. senate. u.s. senator bob menendez, democratic incumbent and republican challenger, joe kyrillos. question candidates tonight, the editorial page editor of "the record and herald news." brigid callahan harrison, professor of political science at state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record hurt and my colligan chief clinical correspondent for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle, which is seen throughout the broadcast. here's the rules throughout the debate. each candidate will have 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement in a show of 60 seconds to answer questions from our panel. then move onto the next question. there is a timing light here to keep us on schedule. it is my job to try and force that. the audience has promised once again to make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to the candidates by holding their applause until we have this broadcast. it conducted during the conversation during the broadcast come you can follow us on twitter using the hash tag and jay debate
of us would meet at 6:30 p.m., what gandhi attempted to do in south africa and accomplished in india. a civil disobedience, we studied the great religion of the world, we studied for what dr. martin luther king, jr. was all about and we were ready and we would be standing and at the theater were going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten. but we didn't strike back as a way of living in a way of life that is better to love than to hate. we wanted to build a love of community and be reconciled so this book is also about reconciliation to give you one example. i first came to washington, d.c. the first, 1961 to go on something called the freedom ride. 13 of us, seven white and 14 african-american. we came here on may 1st and studied and participated in non-violent workshops and i will lover frigate on the night of may 3rd someplace in downtown rest pete -- washington we went into a restaurant and i had never been to a chinese restaurant or had a meal at a chinese restaurant. that night we had a wonderful meal. the food was good, and someone said you should eat well because this migh
of enforcement process that we use is a penalty type process that, in the cases of people who aren't carriers or broadcasters, in other words people who don't hold licenses from the fcc are statutorily required as the first item of business to issue a citation to that entity and the point of that requirement is to alert this entity that they not specifically be aware that it's operating in a regulated space that the fcc is involved in. we have to tell them you are doing something that you're not allowed to do and then if they do it again after having been wanted, then we have the power to go ahead and start a penalty proceeding and the way that works and not to get too bogged down in the enforcement, is that we would issue something called the notice of apparent liability and the stems directly from the statutory enforcement procedures that the fcc has, where we tell the alleged wrongdoer what law they have violated, when we believe they did that and what penalty we are proposing to impose for that violation and give them an opportunity to respond to that. we then need to hear what they have
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